Remember For Me
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Remember for me

A collective tribute page honoring individuals with dementia and the people who love them.

I remember for…

Celia

I remember how you waited every night for your 6 little kids, now grown, to come home. We were so loved.

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Aunt Connie

Remembering Aunt Connie Mills Whitehead. Always beautiful! The last time I saw you, I asked you if you knew who was and you looked up and smiled and nodded yes. Rest in heavenly peace Aunt Connie.

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Remembering

I worked in several nursing homes in a ten year span in my 30-40s. I took care of a lot of dementia patients. It was a tough job but I loved it. I love taking care of people. I loved the stories the patients told me because it was usually when they were little. Sometimes us nursing aids were their only family and they trusted us with their memories.

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Norma Griner

So much to say. Without saying so much about her past, I have to say more about her more recent years where she was impactful just so many around the world with her lunch of music, her love of people, and her infectious spirit. View her videos and you’ll know what I mean.

https://fb.watch/bLneEatsba
http://youtube.com/@Norma-and-Larrys-journey

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Judy Hunter

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Judy Hunter

My aunt, Judy Hunter, is my father’s second oldest sister. She was married, until his death, to a Statistics professor at the University of Wisconsin – Madison. There is no doubt in my mind that I would’ve become a very different person if she hadn’t seen something she liked in me and made me feel special. No matter how young I was, she made me feel like my thoughts were valuable. She always took me aside at large family gatherings to spend time with just me. She opened my eyes to how life could be lived differently than the one I grew up in: organic eating, tai chi, fondue, community gardens, lifelong book clubs. She was a passionate, renowned expert/speaker on Thomas Merton. She spent years documenting our family’s genealogy in incredible detail. I once asked a simple question about it. She went into such so much historical political and religious data and personal family history that I had to get out a notebook to keep track of it all. I get my long-windedness from her. 🙂 She was a successful attorney (at a time when most women were not working professionals) who in later years worked to teach older folks how to protect their money from devious fraudsters. The first time I ever travelled without my parents was to stay with my aunt in Madison when I was around 15 years old. I loved every minute of it. She has been in a care facility for some time now due to her dementia. She has a wonderful set of caregivers who email updates weekly. It is always a joyous moment when the updates include her sounding just like her old self – stubbornly resisting help and getting her button done herself, speaking up for herself, etc. She doesn’t care to eat much anymore, but she still like chocolate which I send to her with pictures of us together. She doesn’t remember me, but she recognizes me as family and has told the caregiver, “I’ve always liked her.”
I’ve always loved her.
I can’t bear the day she is gone.

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Mithun and aanchal

How ridiculously happy and in love you both were with each other and in life. Will miss you forever beautiful ones.

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Wilhelm

I remember all the nicknames you gave us as children writing to me in German and “pepper” money for our daughters. Tobacco pipes German mugs, sitting in your chair with a newspaper. Helping plan our trips handing us a welcome drink after our long journeys to reach you both, endless lazy days chatting and laughing . Reading at our wedding and feeling so very proud ❤️

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Shirley

I remember your amazing wit, your love of languages and the arts, and your infectious laughter.

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Wilhelm

I remember sitting on your foot as a toddler while you searched the house for me, calling out like you didn’t know where I was.

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Wilhelm

I remember the way your hands smelled like automotive oil when you came home from work each night and how your fingers felt as you patted my head.

Whilelm
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Wilhelm

I remember how happy you were when you finally got to be a grandpa.

I remember how happy you were when you finally got to be a grandpa.
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Wilhelm

I remember how proud you were when, because of you, I achieved things you never had the opportunity to do.

I remember how proud you were
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Wilhelm

I remember how much you loved her.

Love
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Wilhelm

I remember how you’d pick me up and put me on your shoulders when I got too tired.

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Wilhelm

I remember you teaching me how to drive, how we spent hours in an abandoned parking lot and every so often you’d yell ‘dog’ and I’d slam on the brakes so hard we almost got whiplash.

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Viola

I remember the letters you wrote to me when I lived across the country and you always signed them “sealed with a sweet kiss.”

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Wilhelm

I remember when you and mom visited me in Japan and we got in an argument on the train and missed our stop.

I remember when you and mom visited me in Japan
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Iamgene

I remember when I took you to McDonald’s for your hamburger and fries. We took your special treat to the park and had dinner together. You were doing well that evening and we talked about the weather and other simple things.

I remember when I took you to McDonald's
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Patricia

I remember that I once made Yorkshire Pudding for Thanksgiving Dinner using Turkey drippings instead Roast drippings. You were so amazed that it came out tasting good that you told everyone about my “scandalous” substitution for weeks.

Yorkshire Pudding recipe
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Celia

I remember how you waited every night for your 6 little kids, now grown, to come home. We were so loved.

Aunt Connie

Remembering Aunt Connie Mills Whitehead. Always beautiful! The last time I saw you, I asked you if you knew who was and you looked up and smiled and nodded yes. Rest in heavenly peace Aunt Connie.

Remembering

I worked in several nursing homes in a ten year span in my 30-40s. I took care of a lot of dementia patients. It was a tough job but I loved it. I love taking care of people. I loved the stories the patients told me because it was usually when they were little. Sometimes us nursing aids were their only family and they trusted us with their memories.

Norma Griner

So much to say. Without saying so much about her past, I have to say more about her more recent years where she was impactful just so many around the world with her lunch of music, her love of people, and her infectious spirit. View her videos and you’ll know what I mean.

https://fb.watch/bLneEatsba
http://youtube.com/@Norma-and-Larrys-journey

Judy Hunter

Judy Hunter

My aunt, Judy Hunter, is my father’s second oldest sister. She was married, until his death, to a Statistics professor at the University of Wisconsin – Madison. There is no doubt in my mind that I would’ve become a very different person if she hadn’t seen something she liked in me and made me feel special. No matter how young I was, she made me feel like my thoughts were valuable. She always took me aside at large family gatherings to spend time with just me. She opened my eyes to how life could be lived differently than the one I grew up in: organic eating, tai chi, fondue, community gardens, lifelong book clubs. She was a passionate, renowned expert/speaker on Thomas Merton. She spent years documenting our family’s genealogy in incredible detail. I once asked a simple question about it. She went into such so much historical political and religious data and personal family history that I had to get out a notebook to keep track of it all. I get my long-windedness from her. 🙂 She was a successful attorney (at a time when most women were not working professionals) who in later years worked to teach older folks how to protect their money from devious fraudsters. The first time I ever travelled without my parents was to stay with my aunt in Madison when I was around 15 years old. I loved every minute of it. She has been in a care facility for some time now due to her dementia. She has a wonderful set of caregivers who email updates weekly. It is always a joyous moment when the updates include her sounding just like her old self – stubbornly resisting help and getting her button done herself, speaking up for herself, etc. She doesn’t care to eat much anymore, but she still like chocolate which I send to her with pictures of us together. She doesn’t remember me, but she recognizes me as family and has told the caregiver, “I’ve always liked her.”
I’ve always loved her.
I can’t bear the day she is gone.

Mithun and aanchal

How ridiculously happy and in love you both were with each other and in life. Will miss you forever beautiful ones.

Wilhelm

I remember all the nicknames you gave us as children writing to me in German and “pepper” money for our daughters. Tobacco pipes German mugs, sitting in your chair with a newspaper. Helping plan our trips handing us a welcome drink after our long journeys to reach you both, endless lazy days chatting and laughing . Reading at our wedding and feeling so very proud ❤️

Shirley

I remember your amazing wit, your love of languages and the arts, and your infectious laughter.

Wilhelm

I remember sitting on your foot as a toddler while you searched the house for me, calling out like you didn’t know where I was.

Wilhelm

I remember the way your hands smelled like automotive oil when you came home from work each night and how your fingers felt as you patted my head.

Whilelm

Wilhelm

I remember how happy you were when you finally got to be a grandpa.

I remember how happy you were when you finally got to be a grandpa.

Wilhelm

I remember how proud you were when, because of you, I achieved things you never had the opportunity to do.

I remember how proud you were

Wilhelm

I remember how much you loved her.

Love

Wilhelm

I remember how you’d pick me up and put me on your shoulders when I got too tired.

Wilhelm

I remember you teaching me how to drive, how we spent hours in an abandoned parking lot and every so often you’d yell ‘dog’ and I’d slam on the brakes so hard we almost got whiplash.

Viola

I remember the letters you wrote to me when I lived across the country and you always signed them “sealed with a sweet kiss.”

Wilhelm

I remember when you and mom visited me in Japan and we got in an argument on the train and missed our stop.

I remember when you and mom visited me in Japan

Iamgene

I remember when I took you to McDonald’s for your hamburger and fries. We took your special treat to the park and had dinner together. You were doing well that evening and we talked about the weather and other simple things.

I remember when I took you to McDonald's

Patricia

I remember that I once made Yorkshire Pudding for Thanksgiving Dinner using Turkey drippings instead Roast drippings. You were so amazed that it came out tasting good that you told everyone about my “scandalous” substitution for weeks.

Yorkshire Pudding recipe